Fail-safe

I have never been that girl to make New Years resolutions or goals. Why try for something I’m sure to fail at? It’s just easier to be me. To stay right where I’m at. It’s safe here. I know here.

Sure I’m not entirely happy with here but out there is scary. What if I fail? What if I try something and it doesn’t work? What if I tell people about it and I fail publicly? It’s just easier not to.

But what if you can’t not. What if its actually harder on you to stay where you are. What if the most alive you will feel is in stepping out of the boat? Sure its safer on board. I mean, it’s drier and warmer at least.

One of my favourite speakers often talks about how we really shouldn’t fear death because our chance of dying is 1/1, but we should fear not really living.

How many of us will get to the end of our days wishing we had really lived?

I did something risky recently. I put myself out there for a passion project. I put it in the hands of someone who could essentially “make or break” me. And I confess, waiting for a response sent me into a bit of a tailspin. I shared with a friend during my season of waiting, “but what if I am rejected?” Without missing a beat she responded “so you make it better and try again.”

Right.

It was so simple.

In my mind I would collapse into a heap on the floor in uncontrollable sobs and my life would be over. But she was right. It wasn’t the end. It was a stop along the way.

She went on to tell me that this persons rejection didn’t mean I would stop the project. It just meant I could use the feedback to tweak it and make it even better. The rejection would be a gift. And sure enough, the rejection came. And I did not collapse into a heap. I read the feedback and it was bang on. She saw something I didn’t. And using the suggestions for improvement will indeed make it better.

What I’ve come to realize in the difference between “great people” and “ordinary people” is that often the great ones simply didn’t give up. They persisted. Their greatness was mined through the fire of their own rejections and struggles.

Don’t be afraid to set those goals. Don’t be afraid to dream big.

“Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It’s not just in some of us; it’s in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.” Marianne Williamson

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